Multisectoral Aquaculture Engagement

Charting the course for domestic aquaculture in the United States is complex and multifaceted. Meridian is creating a space where sectors can come together, learn from each other, and identify paths forward for the industry.

Growing demand for sustainable protein has accelerated financial and political investment in aquaculture production in the U.S. However, ocean stakeholders and coastal community leaders have diverse opinions as to whether the U.S. can develop a sustainable and equitable domestic aquaculture industry and, if so, how to realize such an industry.

Building out this industry, requires addressing concerns and interests from various ocean stakeholders. For example, while commercial fishermen may worry about market competition from new seafood products and fishing ground disruptions, environmental groups often prioritize minimizing impacts on marine species and habitats.

In response to rising interest in this topic from federal agencies, Congress, investors, companies, and NGOs, Meridian is facilitating cross-sectoral engagement to increase understanding among ocean stakeholders (e.g., commercial and recreational fishermen, aquaculture industry and finance, seafood supply chain, environmental NGOs, tribal and local community leaders) to inform responsible development of U.S. marine aquaculture. Meridian is also engaging practitioners who are working to expand representation in the domestic aquaculture workforce to scope out actions for enhancing diversity, equity, and inclusion in the industry.

As a trusted third party, Meridian is working to build common ground through solutions-oriented dialogue and create trusted spaces for affected sectors to discuss values, needs, concerns, and opportunities regarding the future of U.S. marine aquaculture. Insights and opportunities from this work can guide discussion on key issues and enhance collaborative solutions.

Project Documents

Design Workshop Summary Report: Multisectoral Scenario Planning and Solution Building for the Future of U.S. Marine Aquaculture – Spring 2022